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  Oracle Tips by Burleson

Oracle RAC Cache Fusion and I/O Bandwidth

Oracle RAC Cache Fusion uses a high-speed IPC interconnect to provide cache-to-cache transfers of data blocks between instances in a cluster. This is called data block shipping. This eliminates the disk I/O and optimizes read/write concurrency. Block reads take advantage of the speed of IPC and an interconnecting network.

The cache-to-cache data transfer is performed through the high speed IPC interconnect. The Oracle Global Cache Service (GCS) tracks blocks that were shipped to other instances by retaining block copies in memory. Each such copy is called a past image (PI). The GCS, via the LMSx background process, tracks one or more past image versions (PI) for a block in addition to the traditional GCS resource roles and modes. In the event of a node failure, Oracle can reconstruct the current version of a block by using a saved PI.


The above book excerpt is from:

Oracle RAC & Grid Tuning with Solid State Disk
Expert Secrets for High Performance Clustered Grid Computing

ISBN: 0-9761573-5-7
Mike Ault, Donald K. Burleson

http://www.rampant-books.com/book_2005_2_rac_ssd_tuning.htm  

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